Fast Blood

hurricanes through me

912 notes

catmonocles:


CHASTE | (songs for the three virgin goddesses.)


i. lullaby (mountain) - the acorn | ii. providence - lisa mitchell | iii. flowers in your hair - the lumineers | iv. down in the valley - the head and the heart | v. shiver - lucy rose | vi. home - daughter | vii. lanterns - evening hymns | viii. by the horns - julia stone

catmonocles:

CHASTE | (songs for the three virgin goddesses.)

i. lullaby (mountain) - the acorn | ii. providence - lisa mitchell | iii. flowers in your hair - the lumineers | iv. down in the valley - the head and the heart | v. shiver - lucy rose | vi. home - daughter | vii. lanterns - evening hymns | viii. by the horns - julia stone

(via decomposion)

1,557 notes

entertainmentweekly:

"While making Boyhood, Ethan Hawke, Linklater’s frequent collaborator, watched Coltrane evolve from a self-assured kid into an introspective, soft-spoken young man."

Ethan Hawke interviews his co-star Ellar Coltrane here

Photo Credit: JOE PUGLIESE for EW

368 notes

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of being and ideal grace.
I love thee to the level of every day’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for right.
I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (via observando)

138,946 notes

Oh my God, what if you wake up some day, and you’re 65, or 75, and you never got your memoir or novel written; or you didn’t go swimming in warm pools and oceans all those years because your thighs were jiggly and you had a nice big comfortable tummy; or you were just so strung out on perfectionism and people-pleasing that you forgot to have a big juicy creative life, of imagination and radical silliness and staring off into space like when you were a kid? It’s going to break your heart. Don’t let this happen.
Anne Lamott (via cytologic)

(Source: jerfreyy, via samantharaebailo)

36,955 notes

I remember my son once asked me, “Did you ever, like, kiss in high school?” And I told him this long drawn-out story of how shy I was, how I finally got a girlfriend but she broke up with me because I was too shy to try to kiss her, and then I had another girlfriend but still couldn’t figure out kissing. The technique was always a big obstacle in my head, like, How do you kiss? Where does your chin go? Forget about anything beyond kissing-first base was a total mystery to me. So I’m telling my son this long story, and he listens patiently until he finally realizes where I’m going with it, and he says, “Dad, no-did you like Kiss in high school? Kiss, the band!” And I was, “Oh yeah, Kiss…they were good.”
Steve Buscemi (via moeoftoe)

(via vincecarters)

789 notes

tuneage:

Playlist: New Pop Feminism
In the 1990s TLC, Destiny’s Child, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Missy Elliot, Xena: Warrior Princess, and the Spice Girls introduced an entire generation to messages of girl power and gender equality.
Today, new art and artists have taken up that call, from Beyonce to Orange Is The New Black, from Girls to Lorde. Theirs is not the feminism of the 90s; greater attention is paid to issues of intersectionality between gender, race, sexuality, and class, and the influx of the internet and fragmentations in media and culture have changed the feminist landscape. But many of the underlying issues are the same, now told through new voices. 
Pop culture can be problematic, but it’s also how a lot of people are first introduced to important ideas. With this week’s playlist, we pay tribute to the feminists making waves here and now, ushering in a new generation of girl power. 

tuneage:

Playlist: New Pop Feminism

In the 1990s TLC, Destiny’s Child, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Missy Elliot, Xena: Warrior Princess, and the Spice Girls introduced an entire generation to messages of girl power and gender equality.

Today, new art and artists have taken up that call, from Beyonce to Orange Is The New Black, from Girls to Lorde. Theirs is not the feminism of the 90s; greater attention is paid to issues of intersectionality between gender, race, sexuality, and class, and the influx of the internet and fragmentations in media and culture have changed the feminist landscape. But many of the underlying issues are the same, now told through new voices. 

Pop culture can be problematic, but it’s also how a lot of people are first introduced to important ideas. With this week’s playlist, we pay tribute to the feminists making waves here and now, ushering in a new generation of girl power.